Son of the Morning Star: Custer and the Little Bighorn by Evan S. Connell book review

Visits: 313

Damn good book about G.A.C. George Armstrong Custer. Son of the Morning Star – glorious light of Lucifer. Roman flame cult – Secret society theater presents – Civil War followed by Indian removal.

Native problem solver, Custer. A man at the bottom of his West Point class, given starring roll in war episode, Civil and Native. He survives the Civil War, only to be sacrificed in native war.

The American people decide to do away with slaves and Indians;

Free the slaves,
kill the Indians,
begin Jim Crow.

End savagery,
begin civilization,
exit the natives.

Enter railroad tycoons, USA, face mask, lock down, mandatory vaccines, track and trace, fake medicine, fake money.

Black powder, carbines, revolvers, hunting dogs, and buffalo soldiers.

Damn good book. Yes, we understand the Indians murdered and maimed the emigrants, slit their throats, made skin suits out of white women, and hung scalps from their head dress.

Sitting Bull sold his autograph for one dollar after being made famous by the “press”.

Custer looks terrific in his parade uniform. Send him to battle. Son of the Morning Star.

Native Problem Solver – G.A.C. George Armstrong Custer

After reading this book, I now believe the US Civil War to be a preliminary distraction (historically and logistically) for the full and unequivocal liquidation of “The North American” native.

We The People, attempting to eliminate ongoing concern of Native badassery, wishing to establish more perfect UNION, do hereby authorize land grab, money printing, and corporate exploitation of New World.

Constitutional ass wipe by emigrants complete.

Commies in FULL CONTROL.

“For the cause of SLAVERY”, the Union men shouted. (<— They never said this.)

“SEND BUFFALO SOLDIERS to remove Sioux, Cheyenne, Apache, etc…”, General Sherman said. (<— He certainly said this.)

Dispatch troops immediately to Western outposts to DELETE INDIANS- once and for all. ARMY surplus of non existent LAND OWNERSHIP.

Railroad tycoons given power after Lamanites, Jaredites, Mulekites, and Nephites fall away from THE LAW.

Thank God the Civil War is over.

After what they did to our glorious Sun of The Morning Star. G.A.C. – and his Seventh Calvary. Totally butchered by the Sioux, Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse, at the Little Bighorn.

He wore a dark blue overcoat, scarlet neck tie, sword and scabbard, wide brim cap, gold epolettes, high boots with Spanish spurs.

Custer failed to outflank Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse. General Benteen and Reno were hung out to dry.

The tragedy reads like other USA failures and setups. DOD fog of war theater.

Act 2 Scene One.

Force all citizens to put a face mask on, lockdown, social distance, lonely grandparents dead w face mask on, lies, terror, fear, MANDATORY INJECTIONS FOR ALL ESSENTIAL WORKERS.

My God, what have you done?

Corporate extortion scam. USA

George Armstrong Custer is dead.

The men are all effeminate bitches. USA fake money commie outpost.

Lockdown for health and safety you miserable fucks.

Damn good book about ancient history, not so long ago, when the goddamn commies try to kill everything and own everybody.

Son of the Morning Star: Custer and the Little Bighorn by Evan S. Connell book review

Thanks to Crazy Horse: A Life (Penguin Lives) by Larry McMurtry for referencing this book.

My annotations and highlights:

Son of the Morning Star: Custer and the Little Bighorn by Evan S. Connell

Book last read: 2024-03-10 19:16:59
Percentage read: 100%

Chapter 0: Chapter 1
Annotation
Chapter progress: 1.08%
Highlight: nation of forty millions of people
Notes: 1876

Chapter 0: Chapter 1
Highlight
Chapter progress: 1.62%
Highlight: Although Custer’s death shocked them, he wrote, they got over it quickly and became rather cheerful.

Chapter 0: Chapter 1
Highlight
Chapter progress: 2.71%
Highlight: Gibbon’s men would report 111 degrees in the shade, 116 degrees inside a tent

Chapter 0: Chapter 1
Annotation
Chapter progress: 3.43%
Highlight: He rode up behind one of them, knocked him down with a stone-headed club and held him under water until he quit struggling.

Notes: Bluecoat.

Chapter 0: Chapter 1
Highlight
Chapter progress: 3.79%
Highlight: the Sioux spoke of the Rees with contempt as Corn Eaters.

Chapter 0: Chapter 1
Annotation
Chapter progress: 3.97%
Highlight: Jacob Halsey, in charge of the Fort Union depot, thought the best thing to do was to vaccinate everybody and he is said to have been surprised when a number of his subjects began vomiting, bleeding, and dying.
Notes: Vaccine hoax.

Chapter 0: Chapter 1
Highlight
Chapter progress: 3.97%
Highlight: brass hats dispatched “school-house officers and pot-house soldiers to treat the Indians as beasts and dogs.

Chapter 0: Chapter 1
Annotation
Chapter progress: 4.33%
Highlight: They observed him guiding Custer through the sacred Black Hills in 1874 and two years later they splashed his brains on Major Reno.

Notes: Indian turncoat, Bloody Knife.

Chapter 0: Chapter 1
Highlight
Chapter progress: 4.33%
Highlight: the government allotted said widow, She Owl, $91.66.

Chapter 0: Chapter 1
Highlight
Chapter progress: 4.69%
Highlight: One day they saw the corpse of an Indian woman in a tree, which was not unusual, but old man Green climbed the tree, shook her down, and used her for wolf bait.

Chapter 0: Chapter 1
Highlight
Chapter progress: 5.23%
Highlight: My God,” she exclaimed, throwing up her hands, “you are the first man I ever saw that is uglier than my husband.

Chapter 1: Chapter 2
Annotation
Chapter progress: 6.68%
Highlight: But devoted subordinates do sometimes fiddle with records, as Americans learn once in a while to their astonishment and dismay.

Notes: Covid scam.

Chapter 1: Chapter 2
Annotation
Chapter progress: 6.68%
Highlight: fired his revolver at some Indians a thousand yards away—or about nine hundred yards out of range.

Notes: Major Reno

Chapter 1: Chapter 2
Annotation
Chapter progress: 7.04%
Highlight: In 1897 he told a reporter from the Atlanta Journal that slavery was not the issue, and he went on to say that he never had known an abolitionist in the Union army.
Notes: not about slavery. Civil War.

Chapter 1: Chapter 2
Highlight
Chapter progress: 7.4%
Highlight: for some reason that is not now clear, he called Reno a son of a bitch and slapped his face.

Chapter 1: Chapter 2
Highlight
Chapter progress: 7.58%
Highlight: Some think I came here to fight Indians, but I came here to fight Mormons.

Chapter 1: Chapter 2
Highlight
Chapter progress: 7.76%
Highlight: “I think you are both God damned Mormons,” he said, “and the Mormons are a set of God damned sons of bitches.”

Chapter 1: Chapter 2
Highlight
Chapter progress: 8.12%
Highlight: He stepped outside and pissed on the tent very close to where the ladies were sitting.

Chapter 1: Chapter 2
Annotation
Chapter progress: 8.48%
Highlight: Rally round the Flag!’ was being sounded in clarion tones by the loyal people of the country.”

Notes: Covid injectors unite.

Chapter 1: Chapter 2
Annotation
Chapter progress: 8.84%
Highlight: Among the pallbearers were the mayor of Atlanta, the governor of Georgia, and a vice-president of Coca-Cola.

Notes: Hi level fraternal bros.

Chapter 1: Chapter 2
Annotation
Chapter progress: 9.93%
Highlight: “I struck him under great provocation with a billiard cue. Can there be any thing criminal in that? Could I, as an officer and gentleman, have acted otherwise?”
Notes: Hehe

Chapter 1: Chapter 2
Highlight
Chapter progress: 10.47%
Highlight: If ever there was a pusillanimous poltroon in the army whose name should be handed down to future generations as an arrant coward, Marcus A. Reno is the man.”

Chapter 2: Chapter 3
Highlight
Chapter progress: 13.9%
Highlight: belligerent Irish lieutenant fresh from West Point,

Chapter 2: Chapter 3
Highlight
Chapter progress: 13.9%
Highlight: “When I give the order,” he told his men, “you may fire as you damned please.

Chapter 2: Chapter 3
Annotation
Chapter progress: 14.08%
Highlight: The time has now fully arrived for teaching these barbarians . . . how to appreciate and respect the power, the justice, the generosity, and magnanimity of the United States.”

Notes: Put face mask on and get INJECTED.

Chapter 2: Chapter 3
Highlight
Chapter progress: 14.08%
Highlight: His face must have been pounded to mush with rocks or clubs because he could be identified only by his pocket watch.

Chapter 2: Chapter 3
Annotation
Chapter progress: 14.26%
Highlight: they wanted $4,000 cash, they wanted the rest of their government annuity in guns and cartridges, “and one thousand white women for wives.
Notes: Lets make a deal.

Chapter 2: Chapter 3
Annotation
Chapter progress: 15.34%
Highlight: but Crazy Horse resisted. “My friend,” he would answer, “why should you wish to shorten my life by taking from me my shadow?”

Notes: No authentic photos of Crazy Horse.

Chapter 2: Chapter 3
Annotation
Chapter progress: 15.52%
Highlight: he would not register at an agency,
Notes: Do not stand up to be counted.

Chapter 2: Chapter 3
Highlight
Chapter progress: 15.88%
Highlight: They fought because the government would not let them alone.

Chapter 3: Chapter 4
Highlight
Chapter progress: 17.15%
Highlight: By 1848 California was in American hands,

Chapter 3: Chapter 4
Annotation
Chapter progress: 17.33%
Highlight: if they would stop wandering around, thereby enabling the government to monitor their activities and punish them for transgressions
Notes: Social credit enabled.

Chapter 3: Chapter 4
Annotation
Chapter progress: 17.33%
Highlight: One might as well expect rivers to run backward as expect free men to live in a coop,
Notes: Fuck u. Goddamn commies.

Chapter 4: Chapter 5
Annotation
Chapter progress: 22.2%
Highlight: It would be easier to visualize Patton kneeling on the carpet in front of Eisenhower.
Notes: Custer begging for war contract.

Chapter 4: Chapter 5
Highlight
Chapter progress: 22.38%
Highlight: Invariably he gives the impression of a man on stage performing as he has been instructed to perform, delivering lines composed by somebody else.

Chapter 4: Chapter 5
Annotation
Chapter progress: 22.38%
Highlight: He could be likened more to an actor than to a playwright.
Notes: Custer is crisis actor.

Chapter 4: Chapter 5
Annotation
Chapter progress: 22.56%
Highlight: How odd that this consummate thespian’s greatest role was a flop. One feels obligated to ask why.

Notes: Secret society Roman country club.

Chapter 4: Chapter 5
Annotation
Chapter progress: 22.92%
Highlight: Nobody has yet managed to explain his remarkable ascent.
Notes: Lizard People

Chapter 4: Chapter 5
Annotation
Chapter progress: 23.1%
Highlight: There is a photograph of him
Notes: Custer in balloon. Ask Circe.

Chapter 4: Chapter 5
Annotation
Chapter progress: 23.29%
Highlight: He yelled at the rebel to surrender but got no response, so he fired.
Notes: Fraternal disorder.

Chapter 4: Chapter 5
Highlight
Chapter progress: 23.83%
Highlight: I feel that my destiny is in the hands of the Almighty. This belief, more than any other fact or reason, makes me brave and fearless as I am.

Chapter 4: Chapter 5
Annotation
Chapter progress: 24.01%
Highlight: He insisted that his costume, especially the cherry necktie, had a purpose.
Notes: Custer costume.

Chapter 4: Chapter 5
Annotation
Chapter progress: 24.55%
Highlight: Custer brushes his teeth with salt, treats his wavy hair with oil of cinnamon, compulsively washes his hands.
Notes: Apocalypse science. Cleanliness.

Chapter 4: Chapter 5
Annotation
Chapter progress: 24.73%
Highlight: Mother, if once you had colored servants you would never want any other.
Notes: Aunt Jemima has been rebranded.

Chapter 4: Chapter 5
Annotation
Chapter progress: 24.91%
Highlight: The lynching party had not brought enough rope. A logical solution was to shoot the last victim, so a ranger drew his pistol and fired; the hammer snapped but nothing else happened and a moment later the Yankee bounded out of sight.

Chapter 4: Chapter 5
Highlight
Chapter progress: 24.91%
Highlight: Along the road one prisoner escaped, allegedly because both he and the guard were Masons.

Chapter 4: Chapter 5
Highlight
Chapter progress: 24.91%
Highlight: Custer lost more men during the Civil War than almost any other commandant.

Chapter 5: Chapter 6
Annotation
Chapter progress: 25.45%
Highlight: Ulysses Grant directed Sheridan to do something about the restless Southwest. Little Phil ordered four thousand troops under Major General Wesley Merritt to San Antonio, another four thousand under Custer to Houston.
Notes: FBI field offices in your city.

Chapter 5: Chapter 6
Annotation
Chapter progress: 26.53%
Highlight: As to trusting the negro of the Southern States with the most sacred and responsible privilege—the right of suffrage—I should as soon think of elevating an Indian Chief to the Popedom of Rome.”

Chapter 5: Chapter 6
Annotation
Chapter progress: 26.71%
Highlight: penurious
Notes: Penny pincher.

Chapter 5: Chapter 6
Annotation
Chapter progress: 26.9%
Highlight: because their heads are so much like the matted cushion that is between the horns of the buffalo.” However the name originated, they were not offended
Notes: Buffalo Soldier.

Chapter 5: Chapter 6
Annotation
Chapter progress: 27.08%
Highlight: , a tempestuous wind that obliged ladies to sew lead weights in the hems of their skirts,
Notes: Prairie winds. Women don’t wear pants.

Chapter 5: Chapter 6
Annotation
Chapter progress: 28.16%
Highlight: We must act with vindictive earnestness against the Sioux, even to their extermination, men, women, and children. Nothing less will reach the root of the case.
Notes: General Sherman to General Grant.

Chapter 6: Chapter 7
Annotation
Chapter progress: 28.34%
Highlight: Fanny Kelly during her five months as an Oglala captive
Notes: Ask Circe.

Chapter 6: Chapter 7
Annotation
Chapter progress: 28.7%
Highlight: General Sherman advised Hancock on March 14, 1867, that Congressional sentiment “prevents our adopting preventive measures.”

Notes: good DOD joke.

Chapter 6: Chapter 7
Annotation
Chapter progress: 28.88%
Highlight: Francis Parkman saw them in 1846.
Notes: Buffalo gone by 1870

Chapter 6: Chapter 7
Annotation
Chapter progress: 28.88%
Highlight: The high plains stank with rotten meat. By 1874 he saw more hunters than animals:
Notes: Buffalo

Chapter 6: Chapter 7
Annotation
Chapter progress: 29.06%
Highlight: a skull suitable for reduction into ladies’ combs brought $1.25.

Notes: Skull market.

Chapter 6: Chapter 7
Annotation
Chapter progress: 30.32%
Highlight: Coronado marched across Kansas in 1542 and from chronicles of this expedition
Notes: Ask Circe.

Chapter 6: Chapter 7
Annotation
Chapter progress: 30.69%
Highlight: he dove headfirst from a second-floor window of the prison hospital at Huntsville, Texas.
Notes: Satanta the native.

Chapter 6: Chapter 7
Annotation
Chapter progress: 30.69%
Highlight: General Sherman, whose photographs now and then give him the aspect of a vulture with scrofula,
Notes: Hehe.

Chapter 6: Chapter 7
Annotation
Chapter progress: 30.69%
Highlight: now the government had decided to alter a centuries-old pattern of life—to make the savage live in a box, wear shoes, turn a furrow, and otherwise emulate wasichu farmers.
Notes: Help us,God.

Chapter 6: Chapter 7
Annotation
Chapter progress: 31.05%
Highlight: Others tidied up by spreading their blankets on anthills—which quite naturally enraged the ants who came swarming to the surface and ate the lice nestled in the blankets.
Notes: Apocalypse science. How to get rid of lice.

Chapter 6: Chapter 7
Highlight
Chapter progress: 31.59%
Highlight: Indians knew the Colt. They had used Colt revolvers many times and knew they were good.

Chapter 6: Chapter 7
Annotation
Chapter progress: 31.77%
Highlight: Black Whiskers went on to say that for a mighty nation to prosecute a war against a few nomads was a disgusting spectacle, “an injustice unparalleled, a national crime most revolting, that must, sooner or later, bring down upon us or our posterity the judgment of Heaven.
Notes: Time for judgement.

Chapter 6: Chapter 7
Annotation
Chapter progress: 31.95%
Highlight: Sherman hoped to avoid this, but he thought there could be no peace until the Indians were removed, one way or another.
Notes: Civil War preliminary distraction for final native liquidation.

Chapter 7: Chapter 8
Annotation
Chapter progress: 32.13%
Highlight: corruption at Fort Leavenworth produced shipments of maggot-infested hardtack—some of the bread delivered to Fort Hays was six years old—and at least once a shipment of rocks invoiced as food.
Notes: Proceed to injection facility for processing.

Chapter 7: Chapter 8
Highlight
Chapter progress: 32.13%
Highlight: Cincinnati Chicken, otherwise known as bacon,

Chapter 7: Chapter 8
Annotation
Chapter progress: 32.13%
Highlight: Pulverizing beans with a revolver was easier than using a rock, but many officers looked upon this practice as a crime.

Notes: coffee beans

Chapter 7: Chapter 8
Annotation
Chapter progress: 32.31%
Highlight: The low desertion rate among blacks has puzzled historians. In 1867,
Notes: Free the slave to fight Indians.

Chapter 7: Chapter 8
Annotation
Chapter progress: 32.85%
Highlight: released them from bondage
Notes: BDSM face mask mandate.

Chapter 7: Chapter 8
Annotation
Chapter progress: 34.12%
Highlight: Each state had in turn elbowed them westward, “and by the time the struggling aborigine was at the safe distance of two or three states away, was virtuously ready to preach fierce denunciation of the people who simply did as it had done.
Notes: Civil War on Indians

Chapter 8: Chapter 9
Annotation
Chapter progress: 36.46%
Highlight: The situation at Fort Hays alarmed him because that was where he had left Elizabeth, so he commandeered three officers and seventy-two men and went galloping off to see her.

Notes: Spanish spurs, wide brim hat, scarlet necktie. Our General Custer. Son of the morning star.

Chapter 8: Chapter 9
Highlight
Chapter progress: 36.46%
Highlight: Enough desertion would imperil the lives of those who remained and a gravely weakened unit could end up as Cheyenne pemmican.

Chapter 8: Chapter 9
Annotation
Chapter progress: 36.46%
Highlight: telegraph lines down.
Notes: 1867

Chapter 8: Chapter 9
Annotation
Chapter progress: 36.64%
Highlight: the water had risen much higher every woman at Fort Hays would have been lashed to a Gatling gun, which was the heaviest equipment in camp.

Notes: Is this in jest?

Chapter 8: Chapter 9
Annotation
Chapter progress: 36.82%
Highlight: there was no epidemic.
Notes: Covid extortion scam.

Chapter 8: Chapter 9
Annotation
Chapter progress: 37.18%
Highlight: On July 28 the gallant husband was arrested, pending court-martial.
Notes: Custer. Our man.

Chapter 8: Chapter 9
Highlight
Chapter progress: 37.36%
Highlight: they gave up their arms when ordered to do so and were then told to leave. But as soon as they began to run the officers opened fire.

Chapter 8: Chapter 9
Annotation
Chapter progress: 37.55%
Highlight: …it is recorded in medical history of a ball having struck the breast bone, and to have been found lodged in the testicles.
Notes: Magic bullet.

Chapter 8: Chapter 9
Annotation
Chapter progress: 37.55%
Highlight: mounted like a conquistador on a coal-black stallion, backed up by his regiment in dress uniform. He wore a blue tunic with gold epaulettes and tassels and stripes, yellow-striped gray trousers, white kid gloves. A saber dangled at his side.
Notes: Horah!

Chapter 9: Chapter 10
Highlight
Chapter progress: 37.91%
Highlight: but the child walked only a few steps before a trooper cut her down.

Chapter 9: Chapter 10
Annotation
Chapter progress: 37.91%
Highlight: one day after receiving this telegram he was on a train to Fort Hays accompanied by two staghounds and a pointer.
Notes: Custer. Our son of light.

Chapter 9: Chapter 10
Highlight
Chapter progress: 37.91%
Highlight: An unnamed lieutenant was observed scalping three women and five children who had been captured alive.

Chapter 9: Chapter 10
Annotation
Chapter progress: 38.27%
Highlight: However such stories evolved, they expressed the fear and rage of Colorado citizens.

Notes: Most likely fake stories.

Chapter 9: Chapter 10
Annotation
Chapter progress: 38.27%
Highlight: holding a captive eagle tethered to a pole.
Notes: Esau the Eagle.

Chapter 9: Chapter 10
Highlight
Chapter progress: 38.63%
Highlight: America might be the only nation in history to have slipped from a primitive estate into decadence without ever knowing civilization.

Chapter 9: Chapter 10
Highlight
Chapter progress: 38.63%
Highlight: Montana Congressman James Cavanaugh spoke for most Americans of that period: “I have never seen in my life a good Indian . . . except when I have seen a dead Indian.

Chapter 9: Chapter 10
Annotation
Chapter progress: 39.17%
Highlight: And suddenly the morning star emerged from a ground fog, rising with such brilliance that at first the astonished men mistook it for a rocket.
Notes: Hehe. I see u.

Chapter 9: Chapter 10
Annotation
Chapter progress: 39.17%
Highlight: No doubt he hoped to save the woman,
Notes: No doubt.

Chapter 9: Chapter 10
Highlight
Chapter progress: 39.35%
Highlight: a mass of Uncle Sam’s cavalry thirsty for glory….

Chapter 9: Chapter 10
Annotation
Chapter progress: 39.35%
Highlight: yet it seems to be true that when the band opened up with Custer’s theme song his benumbed troops charged violently and perhaps even enthusiastically toward the village,
Notes: Que the music.

Chapter 9: Chapter 10
Annotation
Chapter progress: 39.53%
Highlight: but symbolically it seems right to say he was born at dawn in Oklahoma beneath the bright soft light of Venus. No matter how he got the name, he liked to be called Son of the Morning Star.
Notes: Children of the light. Beware.

Chapter 10: Chapter 11
Highlight
Chapter progress: 44.4%
Highlight: She describes a mechanical contraption consisting of a series of wooden paddles strung on a rope. This device was meant to keep flies away from the supper table. The boards moved and clattered because a Negro boy pulled the rope,

Chapter 11: Chapter 12
Annotation
Chapter progress: 46.57%
Highlight: You are fools to make yourselves slaves to a piece of bacon fat, some hardtack, and a little sugar and coffee.”

Notes: US Army.

Chapter 11: Chapter 12
Annotation
Chapter progress: 46.75%
Highlight: huge drops of perspiration coursed down their bronze faces and with trembling hands they laid the instrument down.
Notes: Showing Indians the telephone.

Chapter 11: Chapter 12
Annotation
Chapter progress: 47.47%
Highlight: Sitting Bull mobbed by fans while wearing green wire goggles. It sounds like Hollywood.
Notes: Are these stories all fake?

Chapter 11: Chapter 12
Highlight
Chapter progress: 47.83%
Highlight: they refused to admit that an uneducated savage could have defeated a West Point graduate.

Chapter 11: Chapter 12
Highlight
Chapter progress: 48.56%
Highlight: Americans needed to believe that the man who defeated Custer must have graduated from an eminent academy such as West Point or St. John’s.

Chapter 12: Chapter 13
Annotation
Chapter progress: 51.81%
Highlight: For a long time the Indians who lived in that area had regarded the cave as an unearthly place and had left offerings—bracelets, pipes, flints, beads. Other artifacts were noted during Custer’s visit: a rusty knife blade, a shaving brush, an old flintlock horse pistol, a Canadian penny, a human skull with three holes in the forehead
Notes: Cave treasure.

Chapter 12: Chapter 13
Annotation
Chapter progress: 51.81%
Highlight: He addresses her as “My Sunbeam” and “My Sweet Rosebud.”

Notes: Dearest wife.

Chapter 12: Chapter 13
Annotation
Chapter progress: 51.99%
Highlight: the men of the Seventh plucked flowers, played ball, joked, explored valleys and ridges, and listened to the band while squinting attentively at anything which might be a camouflaged Sioux.
Notes: Campout

Chapter 12: Chapter 13
Annotation
Chapter progress: 51.99%
Highlight: the fresh white canvas flapping and rocking like sails through dark green foliage.
Notes: Wagon train.

Chapter 12: Chapter 13
Annotation
Chapter progress: 52.35%
Highlight: For the hives of industry will take the place of dirty wigwams. Civilization will ere long reign supreme and throw heathen barbarianism into oblivion. Seminaries of learning will raise their proud cupolas far above the canopy of Indian lodges, and Christian temples will elevate their lofty spires upward towards the azure sky while places of heathen mythology will sink to rise no more. This will be a period of true happiness.

Notes: Proceed to injection facility for processing.

Chapter 12: Chapter 13
Annotation
Chapter progress: 52.53%
Highlight: The customary treatment for just about every ailment in those knobby days was quinine, iodine, or epsom salts.

Notes: Apocalypse science

Chapter 12: Chapter 13
Highlight
Chapter progress: 52.89%
Highlight: The men played the popular game of Base Ball.

Chapter 12: Chapter 13
Annotation
Chapter progress: 53.07%
Highlight: Pleasant as be the pastures in which their children have sported, and the slopes that hold the bones of their dead, they must leave them for the land of the stranger, and stand not upon the order of their going. There is gold in the hills and rivers of the region, and the white man desires to take possession of it.
Notes: Chicago Tribune

Chapter 12: Chapter 13
Annotation
Chapter progress: 53.07%
Highlight: The band struck up “Garry Owen.
Notes: Custer theme music.

Chapter 12: Chapter 13
Highlight
Chapter progress: 53.25%
Highlight: “Oh thou mighty and omnipotent, great and revered Almighty Dollar! Thou makest mankind corrupt and rotten! For thy smile men commit murder, sacrifice every noble feeling, cut the throat of father, mother, brother or sister to gain thee. Men lose their hope of heaven….”

Chapter 12: Chapter 13
Annotation
Chapter progress: 53.79%
Highlight: oats, bacon, flour, coffee, sugar, dried fruit.
Notes: Apocalypse science. Supplies

Chapter 13: Chapter 14
Annotation
Chapter progress: 55.96%
Highlight: Something occult gathers inexplicably around this day.
Notes: June 25. Watch out.

Chapter 14: Chapter 15
Highlight
Chapter progress: 58.48%
Highlight: They would resist with utmost bitterness.

Chapter 14: Chapter 15
Annotation
Chapter progress: 58.84%
Highlight: Of course the gods must look upon him with approbation. If not, how could he have risen to such high rank with such ease?

Notes: Secret society gods of the underworld. False flag chaos magicians.

Chapter 14: Chapter 15
Highlight
Chapter progress: 59.21%
Highlight: He probably enlisted because jobs were hard to get after the Panic of 1873 when it was starve, stand in line for soup, or visit a recruiting depot.

Chapter 14: Chapter 15
Annotation
Chapter progress: 59.21%
Highlight: Far better it is to dare mighty things . . . than to take rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much, because they live in the gray twilight that knows not victory nor defeat.
Notes: Face mask vaccine lockdown covid death cult.

Chapter 15: Chapter 16
Highlight
Chapter progress: 64.98%
Highlight: , if you make men sufficiently fearful or angry the hot red eyes of cavemen will glare out at you.

Chapter 15: Chapter 16
Annotation
Chapter progress: 65.16%
Highlight: Unidentified soldiers later cut off the entire head, which was boiled and shipped to the Smithsonian,
Notes: Jesuit spirit cooking.

Chapter 16: Chapter 17
Annotation
Chapter progress: 65.34%
Highlight: Such men obviously did not lose their wits.
Notes: Obviously.

Chapter 16: Chapter 17
Highlight
Chapter progress: 65.52%
Highlight: therefore it was advisable to praise Custer and his troops.

Chapter 16: Chapter 17
Annotation
Chapter progress: 66.25%
Highlight: We knew what the silver was, but the paper we didn’t know.
Notes: Fake money.

Chapter 16: Chapter 17
Annotation
Chapter progress: 66.61%
Highlight: French leave.
Notes: Deserter

Chapter 16: Chapter 17
Annotation
Chapter progress: 67.33%
Highlight: Sitting Bull did not attend because he was touring the East with Buffalo Bill’s extravaganza,
Notes: 1886 reunion at battlefield.

Chapter 16: Chapter 17
Annotation
Chapter progress: 67.51%
Highlight: A hundred years after Lincoln’s death a hole was cut in his casket and a man was appointed to peep inside, just to make sure.
Notes: Is this true?

Chapter 17: Chapter 18
Highlight
Chapter progress: 67.87%
Highlight: the red emblem of a secret society painted on his forehead.

Chapter 18: Chapter 19
Annotation
Chapter progress: 70.76%
Highlight: There was gold in the Black Hills and the Northern Pacific Railroad must be built.
Notes: Manifest destiny.

Chapter 18: Chapter 19
Highlight
Chapter progress: 70.94%
Highlight: Killing a mess of Indians is the only recreation our frontier rangers want,” yelped the Dallas Daily Herald.

Chapter 19: Chapter 20
Highlight
Chapter progress: 72.74%
Highlight: if an American army could be regarded as picturesque it was because of a certain uncouth seediness,

Chapter 19: Chapter 20
Highlight
Chapter progress: 72.74%
Highlight: It has been estimated that during the Indian Wars the United States spent approximately a million dollars to kill each red man.

Chapter 19: Chapter 20
Annotation
Chapter progress: 73.1%
Highlight: Examples of just such Ceremonial Weeping I have seen at the Rosebud, at the Sun Dance and elsewhere. It was an observance known to the Hebrews,
Notes: Lost tribes.

Chapter 20: Chapter 21
Annotation
Chapter progress: 74.73%
Highlight: Two red spots declare that he touched two white men.

Notes: Red equals white.

Chapter 20: Chapter 21
Annotation
Chapter progress: 75.63%
Highlight: Apparently he thought his ancestors were English.
Notes: Custer.

Chapter 20: Chapter 21
Annotation
Chapter progress: 75.63%
Highlight: Without doubt the patronymic is Teutonic.
Notes: But really, Custer is German.

Chapter 20: Chapter 21
Annotation
Chapter progress: 75.63%
Highlight: The first member of the family to reach America was a farmer and mason
Notes: Secret society hand wave.

Chapter 20: Chapter 21
Highlight
Chapter progress: 75.63%
Highlight: So he sprang from that race of blue-eyed long-nosed devils who once upon a time trotted arrogantly through cold black forests with the North Sea in their veins; and being who he was he must have felt their eyes on him as he galloped across the American prairie, strawberry curls flowing in the wind.

Chapter 20: Chapter 21
Annotation
Chapter progress: 75.99%
Highlight: lachrymose
Notes: Tearful or given to weeping.

Chapter 21: Chapter 22
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Chapter progress: 76.17%
Highlight: Mr. J. W. Buel, whose imaginative Heroes of the Plains

Chapter 21: Chapter 22
Annotation
Chapter progress: 76.35%
Highlight: More painters and writers have converged on the Little Bighorn than on Gettysburg, which is puzzling.
Notes: Civil Indian War.

Chapter 21: Chapter 22
Annotation
Chapter progress: 76.35%
Highlight: We know only that it will be remembered as long as the nation lasts.
Notes: Almost forgotten. Time is up.

Chapter 21: Chapter 22
Highlight
Chapter progress: 76.35%
Highlight: Because it was the greatest Indian victory, some say. Not true. In 1791 Chief Little Turtle’s Miamis destroyed the army of General Arthur St. Clair, killing 632 soldiers—more than twice as many as Custer lost.

Chapter 21: Chapter 22
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Chapter progress: 77.44%
Highlight: During the Rosebud fight General Crook’s troops burned up twenty-five thousand rounds of ammunition while killing approximately twenty-five Sioux,
Notes: Wtf

Chapter 21: Chapter 22
Annotation
Chapter progress: 77.8%
Highlight: A short-haired general commanding what might be mistaken for a limping drunken mob of itinerant farmhands
Notes: Seventh Calvary.

Chapter 21: Chapter 22
Annotation
Chapter progress: 78.7%
Highlight: A fierce black warrior with a knife between his teeth kneels on a cavalryman’s back to peel away the top of his head, distorting the features until the Anglo face looks Oriental.

Notes: Full house. Race war poker.

Chapter 22: Chapter 23
Annotation
Chapter progress: 79.96%
Highlight: One exception occurred in 1832 because of a brilliant meteor shower on November 12
Notes: Check space records.

Chapter 22: Chapter 23
Annotation
Chapter progress: 80.69%
Highlight: Custer went down with a bullet in the side, another in the head.
Notes: May have shot himself to avoid mutilation.

Chapter 22: Chapter 23
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Chapter progress: 80.87%
Highlight: he could feel within himself the seed of his own importance.

Chapter 23: Chapter 24
Annotation
Chapter progress: 83.21%
Highlight: sutler
Notes: DOD contractor.

Chapter 23: Chapter 24
Highlight
Chapter progress: 85.2%
Highlight: I leaped from my pony and cut out his heart and bit a piece out of it and spit it in his face. I got back on my pony and rode off shaking it. I was satisfied and sick of fighting….”

Chapter 23: Chapter 24
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Chapter progress: 85.2%
Highlight: devouring an enemy’s heart still sputters like a prehistoric torch in the human psyche.

Chapter 23: Chapter 24
Annotation
Chapter progress: 85.38%
Highlight: she was unspeakably aroused by his concupiscence or fascinated by the horror of it all, because she married him.

Notes: Hypergamy.

Chapter 23: Chapter 24
Annotation
Chapter progress: 85.56%
Highlight: The Americans went down like sheep,
Notes: Covid scam

Chapter 24: Chapter 25
Annotation
Chapter progress: 85.92%
Highlight: Water wagons made daily trips to the river
Notes: Apocalypse science. Sourcing water.

Chapter 24: Chapter 25
Annotation
Chapter progress: 86.28%
Highlight: The same inscrutable Arbiter that decreed the downfall of Rome has pronounced the doom of extinction upon the red men of America.
Notes: Gd Romans.

Chapter 24: Chapter 25
Annotation
Chapter progress: 86.64%
Highlight: rigidly enforced by the authority of our powerful but ever humane and magnanimous government….
Notes: Face mask lock down vaccine death cult.

Chapter 25: Chapter 26
Annotation
Chapter progress: 88.63%
Highlight: Soldiers—pink and hairy—came riding down a coulee.
Notes: Excellent sentence.

1 comment

  1. Additional anecdotes found in this book: Custer was spotted in New Orleans’s sodomite establishment years after he was supposed to be dead in Battle of the Little Big Horn.

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